GLF Schools

GLF Schools

GLF Schools was founded in 2012 in order to enable the federation of Glyn School (an academy in 2011) and Danetree Junior School. Together, we began our journey to become a MAT of more than 1000 talented staff working with over 10,000 children in 40 schools across 5 regions in southern England.

As a department, we aspire to utilise our expert knowledge and experiences to inspire young people to develop an intellectual curiosity for the complexities of Planet Earth. 

We aspire to create knowledgeable and independent learners who possess a strong sense of respect and empathy in terms of the diverse global issues and challenges we face and a desire to be a part of sustainable solutions to them. 

Glyn Geographers will develop a deep understanding of the processes and flows that shape our planet and be capable of applying their knowledge, understanding and skills to investigate the world for themselves. Their ability to think geographically will transport them well beyond the limits of their personal experiences.

Head of Geography Dr G Bhasin G.Bhasin@glynschool.org

 

Why study this subject?

Our planet is currently facing a significant range of challenges and issues. Climate change threatens our polar and coastal regions, our resources are being used at an unsustainable rate and increased political instability is creating divides and conflicts within communities. A GCSE in Geography helps you to understand the physical and human processes that lead to these challenges and helps us to consider sustainable solutions to turn them into opportunities.

Is it right for me at GCSE?

Geography is a fascinating subject that is ever changing and highly dynamic - if you enjoy learning about the processes that shape the world around you and the strategies to better look after it;Geography is a great option for you!

How is this course assessed at GCSE?

Three written exams.  Each paper is 1 hour 30 minutes.

Paper 1: The Physical Environment (37.5%).

Paper 2: The Human Environment (37.5%).

Paper 3: Geography Investigations and UK Challenges (25%).

Further education opportunities after GCSE?

GCSE Geography can lead to:

  • A Level Geography and Sociology.
  • Geography at University - specialising in Physical or Human Geography.
  • Degree level apprenticeships.
  • Various degree courses include: Environmental Sciences, Waste and Resource Management, Town Planning, Sustainability and Management, Geography, Geology and Development Studies.  Geography also supports many other subjects in the Sciences such as Biogeography, Geochemistry and Geophysics in addition to all of the Social Sciences.

Career opportunities?

Geography opens you up to a wider range of careers. As both an Art and a Science, you develop transferable skills that most employers value (critical think, data analysis, written communication, graphical skills). Careers typically include: Sustainable Development Coordinator, Environmental Consultancy, Wildlife Conservation, Hazard Mapping and Management, Travel and Tourism, Town Planning, Geology and Military. 

 

Year 7 sequence of lessons

Year 7 Curriculum

 

Term 1

7.1 Where in the world are we?

This begins as a transitional topic from KS2 in that we revisit some locational knowledge, key terms, and map skills. However, we broaden and deepen their knowledge in all these aspects while introducing new concepts and skills upon which they will build throughout the 7-year curriculum, most importantly, enquiry skills and a nuanced understanding of place.

Through a focus on their local place, students will begin to understand the human and physical processes that shape places and they will be able to situate themselves in national, regional and global contexts.

Students will carry out a local geographical enquiry that will include the use of map skills, OS maps and GIS as well as data presentation, analysis and evaluation skills.

 

Term 2

7.2 Is Earth running out of natural resources?

This unit builds on knowledge of biomes and the distribution of natural resources in KS2 and on their map and GIS skills.

It introduces the planet, the earth systems and several key physical geography concepts and provides an important foundation for an understanding of the planet that will be revisited and progressed throughout the rest of the curriculum.

Human-physical interaction is explored by looking at how people exploit natural resources, and this is linked to the concepts of change over time and space.

The concepts of sustainability and renewable and non-renewable resources are also introduced which are fundamental for progression throughout the curriculum.

 

Term 3

7.3 What is development?

This unit continues to build locational knowledge, understanding of resources and sustainability and map skills.

Students develop an understanding of development and inequality and how it changes/varies over time and space. 

Broader notion of ‘quality of life’ is used throughout the unit so that the understanding of development is not focused on economic terms. 

Students are given a range of theoretical perspectives and come to understand that geographical knowledge is tentative and contested and will be able to analyse, construct arguments, and make evaluative judgements – these skills are progressed throughout the KS3 regional topics and link to AO3 and AO4 skills at GCSE. This topic links closely to the Global Development topic at GCSE, but also more broadly to all the human geography topics and is fundamental for understanding the interdependence of human-physical processes.

 

Term 4

7.4 What is weather and climate?

This topic builds on basic understanding of weather, the seasons and climate in KS1 and 2, locational knowledge, and it progresses understanding of the Earth’s spheres – focusing on how the atmosphere creates weather and climate, and the working of part of the water cycle.

It develops the principal elements of weather and climate – temperature, rainfall, air pressure, wind, sunshine – and the science of meteorology. 

Students learn about physical processes and human-physical interactions leading to climate change which they will revisit in much more depth in 8.6.

Students will conduct a geographical enquiry collecting weather data to identify the type of weather system passing over their school. This investigation requires pupils to apply their understanding of the earlier lessons in the unit, and further develop their fieldwork and enquiry skills. Understanding of all these basic principles of weather and climate will be developed through the regional units of the KS3 curriculum and at GCSE.

 

Term 5

7.5 How does Ice change the world?

In this physical geography topic, students learn about the fundamental physical processes of erosion, deposition and transportation and how they shape our landscapes, which they will consolidate in Year 9 when they study rivers and coasts. This topic also builds on concepts of weathering, climate zones and climate change in earlier units.

Glacial landforms and glacial processes can be difficult to understand, as they cannot be directly observed, unlike rivers and coasts. This, combined with the slow rate of change of glaciers, makes it difficult to see how they shape the surface of the earth. There are several synoptic links between processes, features, landscapes, time, space and scale.

Students will interpret a variety of OS maps, photographs and satellite images at different scales to understand glacial landforms and their formation. 

 

Term 6

7.6 Is the Geography of Russia a curse or a benefit?

This is the first regional geography unit in the course. Russia is the largest country in the world and an emerging superpower, therefore it is important that pupils learn about the diverse physical and human geography of this nation. 

This topic progresses contextual world knowledge and plays a pivotal role in the course, pulling together and developing concepts, ideas and skills from the systematic geography units such as the tundra and taiga biomes, natural resources and sustainability, development, climate zones and glaciation.

A double lesson geographical enquiry about exploitation of the Arctic further progresses enquiry skills, involving pupils in using a wide variety of geographical data, and different viewpoints to consider the future of this environmental region. This enquiry is an important stepping stone in developing the understanding and evaluative skills that students will ultimately need at GCSE level with AO3 and AO4. 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Year 8 sequence of lessons

Year 8 Curriculum

 

Term 1

8.1 How are populations changing?

This unit introduces important human geography concepts such as population change, population distribution, migration types and models, urbanisation, and land use models. These will all be developed throughout the GCSE and A Level Curriculum.

This topic builds on the concepts of migration and globalisation, inequality, development and population distribution from Year 7 units.

Students will use a wide range of geographical data to investigate why populations are changing; thereby developing their geographical enquiry skills. They will also apply ideas about population to their understanding of development which will build their understanding of interdependence.

 

Term 2

8.2 How is Asia being transformed?

Students apply several key human and physical concepts introduced in previous topics to investigate Asia. The learning builds on ecosystems and resource use, economic activity and development, weather and climate, urbanisation and population from earlier units. 

Students will study the region at a range of scales from the global to the local to expand their knowledge and understanding of how places are shaped by a range of human and physical processes taking place at these different scales.

All aspects of this unit - locational knowledge, people-environment interactions, human geography processes such as uneven urbanisation and development over time and space - will be developed in much more depth in KS4, especially with the focus on India during the Global Development topic, and at A Level.

 

Term 3

8.3 Why does the earth move?

Students may cover some aspects of volcanoes and earthquakes at KS2. Students will understand the distribution of earthquakes and volcanoes, the processes responsible for earthquake and volcanic events and the landforms associated with them.

Students will also consider how our knowledge of plate tectonics has evolved, and how volcanologists, seismologists and other scientists continue to conduct fieldwork to better understand the processes involved. 

They will interpret a variety of maps, photographs and satellite images at different scales, thereby developing their geographical skills. 

Students will also use place-based exemplars to understand the interaction of people-environment processes, which they do throughout the KS3, 4, and 5 curriculums.




 

 

Term 4

8.4 What are the opportunities and challenges facing Africa?

As with the regional topics of Russia and Asia, this unit enables students to apply the substantive knowledge they gained in the development, weather and climate and population units. 

This unit introduces the challenges and opportunities facing Africa. It starts with the danger of the single story, encouraging pupils to challenge stereotypical views of this diverse continent. Pupils will explore the physical geography and colonial history of Africa to give them a grounding upon which to build when studying the development of African countries.

All aspects of this unit - locational knowledge, people-environment interactions, human geography processes such as uneven urbanisation and development over time and space - will be developed in much more depth in KS4 and KS5.

 

Term 5

8.5 Why is the Middle East an important world region?

This unit introduces the concept of a region. It is the final locational unit in the course. The unit further develops pupils’ understanding of many of the concepts introduced in earlier units, most notably development, economy and trade, natural resources, climate, migration and plate tectonics. 

The Middle East is of major world importance and is often in the news. It is important that pupils understand the reasons for this. The unit introduces the complex nature of the region’s ethnic population distribution, the significance of oil, contrasting levels of development and the ongoing conflicts and wars. 

All aspects of this unit - locational knowledge, people-environment interactions, human geography processes such as uneven urbanisation and development over time and space - will be developed in much more depth in KS4 and KS5.

 

Term 6

8.6 How will climate change shape the earth’s future?

This unit provides a review for the whole course. Students are required to consider the future of the planet, in terms of climate change. They are required to apply what they have learnt as geographers to consider what the future might hold. 

Students consider conflicting viewpoints, evidence and the causes and consequences of climate change. 

Students consider the consequences for the UK before conducting an enquiry of Antarctica. In terms of the future, students consider what can be done internationally as a result of the Paris Climate Agreement before considering their own personal response as a geographer. 

Students will further develop their ability to formulate enquiry and argument, to write descriptively, analytically and critically, to communicate their ideas effectively, to develop an extended written argument, and to draw well-evidenced and informed conclusions about geographical questions and issues

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Year 9 sequence of lessons

Term 1

Introduction to the UK and Coasts

This introductory GCSE topic gives students a grasp of the main physical processes which are at work in the UK. These will help students understand the formation of local landforms, starting with coastal landforms, and help foster an understanding of how these landforms combine to shape landscapes. They deepen their understanding of the key physical concepts and processes of erosion, transportation and deposition, which they first learned about in the Glaciation topic in Year 7.

Term 2

Coasts 

Students continue to examine coastal processes and landforms.

They also focus on the human activities at work on coastal landscapes, which helps students develop a holistic understanding of the processes influencing the physical landscape. The interdependence of physical and human processes is key here and throughout the remaining KS4 and KS5 curriculum

Term 3

Rivers

Having completed coastal landscapes, students move on to the physical and human processes, which combine to create river landforms and landscapes.

There is some overlap with coastal processes and so an opportunity to consolidate and interleave the key processes, landforms and landscapes.

Term 4

Rivers 

We continue with river landscapes but in the second half term there is a bigger focus on how human activities impact upon the landscape and how the physical and human characteristics combine to create a distinctive landscape, which brings it all together.

Term 5

Global Development 

Global Development builds on the Year 7 development topic and the other KS3 regional topics. Students will gain a much deeper understanding of the causes and consequences of uneven development, both nationally and globally,  as well as gaining an overview of urban patterns and processes.

We teach this human geography topic first as it helps to establish the  national and global contexts for subsequent topics (Changing Cities, Resource Management and UK Challenges)

Term 6

Global Development

In the 2nd part of Global Development students carry out a detailed case study of challenges that affect India. 

They investigate the factors that have influenced its rapid but uneven development and explore the impacts of rapid development.

This builds on their knowledge and understanding of urban processes and the causes and consequences of uneven national and global development.

Year 10 sequence of lessons

Term 1

Weather and Climate

Students begin year 10 with the Weather and Climate topic.

They build on the concepts that they learned in Year 7 but the focus is now on in-depth understanding of  the key physical processes that drive weather and climate.  They study how and why global climate has changed and as well as a focus on the UK’s unique and changing climate.

The concepts in this topic establish the necessary foundation for the Ecosystems and UK Challenges topics that follow.

Term 2

Weather and Climate

In the second part of the topic, students learn how climate change has potentially influenced the severity of the two hydro-meteorological hazards of tropical cyclones and drought.

Students also develop an understanding of how the impacts of and responses to tropical cyclones and drought vary due to a country’s level of economic development. This ties in with the Global Development topic and highlights the interdependence of people and the environment.

Term 3

Changing Cities

This topic begins with a big-picture overview of the key urban processes and trends that shape the world and then focuses on the challenges that they pose for people living in Birmingham, UK and how these challenges are being managed. The ideas studied here help bring together human geography and people-environment issues from the Global Development Topic and they also link to the UK Challenges in Year 11.

Term 4

Changing Cities

Following an in-depth case study of changing urban processes in Birmingham, UK (home country), students study the evolving urban challenges facing residents of Mexico City, Mexico (an emerging country).

This builds on the students’ knowledge of the causes and consequences of uneven global development from the Year 9 topic.

Term 5

Ecosystems, Biodiversity and Management

This topic starts with an overview of the distribution of the world’s large-scale ecosystems and the factors that influence their distribution.

It builds on  concepts in the Weather and Climate Topic such as the impact of climate on the distribution and characteristics of biomes and  ecosystems.

The focus is then on the interdependence of biotic and abiotic factors of the tropical rainforest, the threats it faces, and its sustainable management in Madagascar.

Term 6

Ecosystems, Biodiversity and Management

In the second part of the topic,

Students learn about the interdependence of biotic and abiotic factors of the temperate forest and its sustainable management in the New Forest, UK.

Rivers Fieldwork

Students will also spend 1 day and approximately 6 lessons on a practical geographical enquiry into river processes and environments that they learned about in Year 9. They do so in a local river landscape.

We do the Rivers Fieldwork at this point in the course because it gives us the opportunity to revisit the Rivers Topic from Term 1 of Year 9.

Year 11 sequence of lessons

Term 1

Resource Management

In this final topic, students learn about the management of resources with an overview of food, energy and water. There are some links to the Ecosystems topic.

They then carry out an in-depth study of water use and management in the UK and further afield, including the USA and China.

The aim is to deepen students’ understanding of the complexities surrounding water management in both the UK and other global locations at differing economic stages of development, thereby linking to the Global Development topic.

Term 2

Urban Fieldwork

Students will spend 1 day and approximately 6 lessons on a practical geographical enquiry into urban processes and environments that they learned about in Year 10 in the Changing Cities topic. They do so in a local urban landscape.

UK Challenges

In the 2nd part of this half term, students draw across their knowledge and understanding from all the previous topics in order to investigate a contemporary challenge for the UK.

It serves as a review topic of the people-environment processes that affect the UK and their future consequences.

Term 3

Extended writing and revision

Students will revise content through exam practice with a focus on extended writing skills

Term 4

Extended writing and revision

Students will

revise content through exam practice with a focus on extended writing skills

Term 5

Study Leave and Exams

Term 6

Exams

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year 12 sequence of lessons

Subject

Half Term 1 

Half Term 2 

Half Term 3 

Half Term 4 

Geography      

1. Globalisation

 2. Tectonic Processes and Hazards

1. Globalisation

 2. Tectonic Processes and Hazards

1. Diverse Places 

2. Coastal Landscapes and Change

1. Diverse Places 

2. Coastal Landscapes and Change

Why we sequence the scheme of work this way

Globalisation

This is a brand new topic which builds on key concepts from the development and urbanisation themes in KS3 and KS4.

Students learn about the concept of globalisation from a historical perspective, introducing the main players and actions that have driven the development of globalisation since the 19th century and accelerated it in post-war years.

They learn that globalisation and global interdependence continue to accelerate, resulting in changing opportunities for businesses, people and the environment. This is an inherently synoptic topic; there are many links with subsequent topics such Diverse Places, Superpowers and Migration, Identity and Sovereignty.

Tectonic Processes and Hazards

At A Level, we interleave the Human and Physical units so as to embed the synoptic Geographical approach from the outset.

Tectonic Processes and Hazards offers students the opportunity to investigate and interpret the physical nature of tectonic processes and their impacts on an ever-changing planet. Students will learn about the history of theories, and develop an appreciation for the complex geography and geology of our planet. These important themes will be developed further in terms of coastal lithology and other areas later in the course, and awareness of the basics of physical processes will help students throughout the course.

Globalisation

In term 2, the third enquiry question of this topic asks students to consider different attitudes towards globalisation and whether the consequences can be managed. They recognise that both tensions in communities and pressures on environments are likely, and that a range of initiatives will help players implement sustainable solutions.

Tectonic Processes and Hazards

In the latter part of the topic, students will make the links between causes of tectonic hazards and the degree to which they can be managed, and they will learn the vital importance of putting in place successful responses that can mitigate social and economic impacts and allow humans to adapt to hazard occurrence.

Diverse Places

Diverse Places offers students an overview of the key issues related to population dynamics and diverse communities, and the opportunities and challenges that stem from them.

Local places vary both demographically and culturally with change driven by local, national and global processes. These processes include movements of people, capital, information and resources, which students learned about in the Globalisation topic. In order to build a deep understanding of place,  students study the place in which they live or study in order to look at demographic and social changes. They then put this local place in context in order to understand how regional, national, international and global influences have led to changes in this place. 

Coastal Landscapes and Change

Students will link to their prior learning of coastal processes and landforms with a much deeper understanding of geomorphological factors and the way they work. The interaction of winds, waves and currents will be studied and the impact of both terrestrial and offshore sediment sources. The sediment budget will help explain the distinctive landforms we see and the influence geology and lithology play. The study of a number of different coastal landscapes will help students appreciate the sheer variety that exists around the world and the reasons why such a variety develops. 

Diverse Places

In the latter part of this topic, students learn that demographically diverse places can experience considerable social inequalities and that variations in past and present connections with places lead to very different lived experiences of places at a local level. The relative success of the management of demographic and cultural changes for individuals and groups depends on that lived experience of change and how perceptions of, and attachments to, the place are changed. 

Coastal Landscapes and Change

In the latter part of this topic, students will investigate why coastal landscapes are increasingly threatened by physical processes and human activities, and the need for holistic and sustainable management of these areas in all the world’s coasts

Year 13 sequence of lessons

Subject

Half Term 1 

Half Term 2 

Half Term 3 

Half Term 4 

Half Term 5

Half Term 6

Geography

1. Migration, Identity and Sovereignty 

2. The Carbon Cycle and Energy Security

1. Migration, Identity and Sovereignty 

2. The Carbon Cycle and Energy Security

1. Migration, Identity and Sovereignty 

2. The Carbon Cycle and Energy Security

Investigation of a contemporary geographical issue

Extended writing and Revision

Study Leave and Exams

Why we sequence the scheme of work this way

Migration, Identity and Sovereignty

This is a very synoptic human geography topic, incorporating important concepts from the Globalisation, Diverse Places and Superpowers topics and promoting their understanding in much greater depth. 

This topic begins with a focus on the effects of migration within and across national borders, before considering how those borders can be disputed and lead to conflict.

Students then move on to study how the contemporary world is a product of a recent colonial past and how many countries are still linked through a shared culture, economic ties or institutions like the Commonwealth. These connections have shaped nations and the identities of people both in Europe and Africa.

The Carbon Cycle and Energy Security

There are many synoptic themes within this unit in terms of linking the impacts of climate change to Globalisation, the potential of Tectonic hazards impacting upon supply and how our demand for fossil fuels affects the hydrological cycle. Finally, there is ample synopticity with the Superpowers topic between the growth of energy rich states such as Russia and the problems associated with countries whose energy security is beginning to fall such as the USA.

After learning how the carbon cycle operates to maintain planetary health, students understand the consequences for people and the environment of our increasing demand for energy.

Migration, Identity and Sovereignty

In the second part of this topic, the focus is on the growth of nationalist movements and how they challenge dominant models of economic change and redefine ideas of national identity and sovereignty. Students also examine how global governance has developed to manage a number of common global issues, and has a mixed record in its success in dealing with them. 

The Carbon Cycle and Energy Security

The water and carbon cycles and the role of feedbacks in and between the two cycles, provide a context for developing an understanding of climate change. Anthropogenic climate change poses a serious threat to the health of the planet. 

Migration, Identity and Sovereignty

In the final part of this topic, students learn that the strength and role of a state can vary and that failed states exist, thereby complicating the notion of unified national identity and sovereignty.

Carbon Cycle

In the final part of this topic, students learn about the range of adaptation and mitigation strategies that could be used to tackle anthropogenic climate change and they understand that global agreements as well as national actions are vital for them to be successful.

Investigation of a contemporary geographical issue

Throughout the course, the students have been developing an issues-based approach to studying geography, enabling them to explore and evaluate contemporary geographical questions and issues such as the consequences of globalisation, responses to hazards, water insecurity and climate change. They have had the opportunity to develop an in-depth understanding of physical and human geography, to understand the complexity of people and environment questions and issues, and to become critical, reflective and independent learners.

The course culminates in giving students the opportunity to investigate several contemporary geographical issues that are entirely synoptic in nature.