GLF Schools

GLF Schools

GLF Schools was founded in 2012 in order to enable the federation of Glyn School (an academy in 2011) and Danetree Junior School. Together, we began our journey to become a MAT of more than 1000 talented staff working with over 10,000 children in 40 schools across 5 regions in southern England.

Empathise with a wide range of human experiences to build social responsibility.

Engage in scholarship in order to inspire a lifelong passion for history.

Appreciate the complexity of history and value diversity.

Understand the human journey, so that students feel enabled to become agents of change

 Head of History Mr A Summers A.Summers@glynschool.org

 

Why study this subject?

History is incredible, fascinating, complex and at times shocking. This course is packed full of interesting people, places, events and colourful stories. We explore the problems, choices and beliefs of people in the past and try to understand why things happened the way that they did. The GCSE History course helps us to understand where we came from, which shapes our decisions about the world around us and our future. There is no one way of seeing the past so you will make your own judgements and challenge and question each other and your teachers. History develops problem solving, critical thinking, research and communication skills. It builds your confidence in a wide range of transferable skills that will help you in your other GCSEs, future studies and careers.

Is this subject right for me at GCSE?

If you would rather debate, discuss and deliberate than be told the ‘facts’, then this is the course for you.

How is this course assessed at GCSE?

Three written exams.  Each paper is 33% towards the final grade.

Further education opportunities after GCSE?

GCSE History can lead to any A Level in Humanities, Politics or Social Science. Post-Sixth Form it is a benchmark academic qualification that will open doors to university or employment.  Research reveals that History turns out more directors of top companies than any other subject, the average starting salary for a History Graduate is £25,000.

Career opportunities?

History provides a good background for all Arts and Social Science careers. It is useful for careers in Archaeology, Heritage, Archive and Museum work. The skills you learn from studying History include investigating, researching documents, examining evidence and presenting arguments. These are valuable in a great number of careers, including Law, Journalism, Politics and Management.

Year 7 sequence of lessons

 

Half Term 1

Half Term 2

Half Term 3

Half term 4

Half term 5

Half term 6

Sequence

of lessons

Key Skills & the Battle of Hastings

This provides our students with core skills in history. We then use these as skills focus for the year 1066 where we practise them using historical subjects.

The Battle of Hastings and  the Norman Conquest

This is used to help students develop their interpretation skills, as well as understanding the nature of Medieval society and beliefs.

Monarchy and the Church: the struggle for power

This is designed to show change over time and how this can be explained. Also explored is the relationship between the Monarch and the people, the development of democracy and Magna Carta. It also explores Englands links to other religions and parts of the world.

Life in Medieval England

To help show how society and standards of living have developed over time and the impact of the Black Death on society and what changes it led to.

Why did Henry VIII change religion in England?

To study the relationship between the Church and the Crown and how this impacts the world around us today in the form of the Church of England. Foundation knowledge for GCSE course.

Elizabeth I and the New Worlds

To show how Elizabeth I dealt with social issues but also how Elizabethan England laid the foundations of Globalisation and inter-action with Africa - this is also designed to provide core knowledge for the Year 8 Slavery topic and GCSE course.

Year 8 sequence of lessons

 

Half Term 1

Half Term 2

Half Term 3

Half term 4

Half term 5

Half term 6

Sequence of lessons

Great Minds and The Industrial Revolution

 

We do not teach the English Civil War, therefore this is designed to plug a gap in chronology and show students what society is like by 1750 and what changes have taken place. This links to knowledge needed for the GCSE Warfare topic.

Slavery and the British Empire

This is to explain to students how interpretations have changed over time. It is also designed to demonstrate How Britain's relationship with the World has changed over time. This builds foundation knowledge for A Level Empire course.

The struggle for Women's Suffrage and World War One

Being an all boys school, it seems logical to study how women's lives have changed and developed over the last century, as well as the local history link to Epsom. We then look at how WW1 changed British society forever. This also links to GCSE Warfare and Nazi Topics.

 

The Rise of Nazi Germany and extreme ideologies

This is part of the curriculum to provide a core base of knowledge which students can take to study with at GCSE. It also looks at the fragility of democracy and human rights, knowledge that forms the core basis of Year 13 Controlled Assessment.

World War Two and the Home Front

A focus on how World War Two changed the UK, the Welfare State and how the war affected ordinary people. Also linked to school and local history. Used as a core base of knowledge for GCSE London in WW2 module and source skills.

Britain after 1945

This unit looks at the great societal changes in Britain after WW2, The creation of the NHS, impact of migration and massive social reforms in the 1960s. This looks to build knowledge for future migration through time course.

Year 9 sequence of lessons

 

Half Term 1

Half Term 2

Half Term 3

Half term 4

Half term 5

Half term 6

Sequence of lessons

USA Civil Rights

This unit looks at what the USA was like after WW2 and then looks at the Civil RIghts movement ,including the role of Martin Luther King. Both this Half term and next half term’s units build knowledge for futurte GCSE and A Level study,

Kennedy and the Cold War

 

This unit looks at the role of the President, in particular JFK, and analyses historical interpretations of him. It focuses on his role within the Cold War, Vietnam, Berlin and Cuban Missile Crisis, and then subsequently looks at his assassination .

Vietnam to end of the Cold War

 

Building on the previous unit, this looks at escalating the war in Vietnam, why the Americans struggled to win and how they withdrew. It then goes on to look at the impact of Watergate and the significance of the Reagan Presidency. This unit builds knowledge for A Level..

What problems did Elizabeth I face when she came to the throne?

We start of with the Elizabeth course as it develops the idea of Chronological History and is conceptually the easiest of the papers.

How did Elizabeth deal with foreign threats to England?

This follows on with Elizabeth solving her domestic issues and then moving to the wider world -  this can then be linked to religious struggle first spoken about in the previous half term.

 

How did Elizabeth change English society?

This is done last as a stand alone topic but then linked to other topics in terms of how these three units link together to form 'Big History'

 

Year 10 sequence of lessons

 

Half Term 1

Half Term 2

Half Term 3

Half term 4

Half term 5

Half term 6

Sequence of lessons

Warfare Through Time 1250-1500

This is linked to original KS3 chronological history of Britain therefore students have a base idea of British society. This module focuses on how Medieval society and warfare were closely linked.

 

Warfare Through Time 1500-1750

This module focuses on key changes to weaponry and tactics during this time period because of the invention of gunpowder. Patterns taught here are revisited in the next two topics.

Warfare through time 1750-1900

This module focuses heavily on the relationship between the Media and changes in Warfare, this referred back to as a recurring theme in the next topic.

Warfare through time 1900-present day

This focuses on the evolution of modern warfare but also compares and contrasts warfare with the last thee topics - these topics focus heavily on causation as a skill.

London during World War Two

This topic focuses heavily on source work and builds upon source work done at the end of Year 8.

he Weimar Republic 1919-1925

Builds heavily on topic in Year 8. Conceptually introducing the idea of communism and fascism and capitalism in more depth and breadth than KS3. Builds on work on Treaty of Versailles in Year 8 and sourcework around it.

 

Year 11 sequence of lessons

 

Half Term 1

Half Term 2

Half Term 3

Half term 4

Half term 5

Half term 6

Sequence of lessons

How did Hitler come to power in Germany in 1933?

Heavily source based course building on skills already introduced in last module with London in WW2. Knowledge that forms core basis of Year 13 Controlled Assessment.

How did the Nazis change society?

Focus on social element of Nazi State and then compared to Weimar Society - use of criteria to judge which society suited different groups of people better. Knowledge that forms core basis of Year 13 controlled assessment.

The Cold War 1941-1962

Taught chronologically in a story-like fashion and exam questions reflect this. Focus on decades with beginning, middle and ends. Taking elements of competing ideologies already taught during Nazi Germany course, lots of links to World War Two and Hitler from last modules and Year 8 SOW.

 

The Cold War 1962 to 1989

Continued referral to ideas introduced at start of course particularly during end of the Cold War and Reagan's role within that.

Due to chronological narrative nature of course continuous referral and comparison between events at start of course are made.

Revision

Revision on kep concepts within each course topic.

  • Change and Continuity

  • Links

  • Causation

  • Chronology

  • Source Skills

  • Essay Writing Skills

 

 

 

Year 12 sequence of lessons

Subject

Half Term 1 

Half Term 2 

Half Term 3 

Half Term 4 

Half Term 5

Half Term 6

             

Why we sequence the scheme of work this way

In half term one Year 12 students will study Units 1 and 2 of the Edexcel A-Level History course. The Units chosen are “In search of the American Dream” USA 1917-1993 and “Apartheid to Rainbow Nation” South Africa 1948-1994. The USA is examined with a focus on essay writing and debate whereas the South Africa course is examined using extended writing there is also assessment of source analysis skills as well using contextual knowledge. These are taught concurrently by different teachers. In the first half term students learn about how Politics and the Presidency have developed over the course of the 20th Century and then the context of South Africa after WW2 and the response to Apartheid policies. These units build upon work previously done in Year 9 on the USA and Year 8 with the decolonisation of the British Empire.

In half term two students build on the foundations of half term one. The USA course focuses on a thematic history of the USA looking at four strands, in this half term we look at the struggle for Civil rights in the USA. Looking at the work of Martin Luther King and the struggle for Women's Rights, Hispanic rights and LGBTQ+ rights. Running concurrently with this the South Africa course covers specifically the struggle for civil rights almost exclusively therefore these two units have many similar concepts that can be compared and used to compliment the study of each.

Following on from this the courses then deviated with the South Africa course looking at resistance and challenge to the National Party when they were in power between 1968 and 1983. To some extent this looks at economic and social challenges and this is complemented by the USA side of the course where students look at changes to USA society and then this links back to prior knowledge within the course of how these changes impacted politics and rights of minorities.

In half term four students will study about the changing quality of life in the USA and what caused this. They will also link back to prior learning to see how these impacted society, individual rights and the presidency showing how the economic issues of the late 1960s and mid 1970s led to the election of Ronald Reagan as President. Using sources pupils will study how Apartheid ended and the creation of A “Rainbow Nation” under Nelson Mandela after his release from Robben Island Prison and how the challenges of society and economy impacted his early premiership. Linking to conceptual ideas looked at on the USA side of the course. 

In half term 5 students build on source skills learned on the South Africa course to apply to sources when studying the Presidency of Ronald Reagan. This unit focuses on the causes of his election but also uses sources to appraise his presidency and challenge some of the myths that surround it. The South Africa course, having finished its content then focuses on revision and embedding knowledge to then be applied in an exam which can be applied to the USA side of the course as well.

During half term 6 because content is completed for Units 1 and 2 we move on to look at learning contextual knowledge to be applied to the controlled assessment. The controlled assessment will be on Nazi Germany in particular focusing on the role of Hitler within the running of the Nazi state. This half term focuses on the contextual knowledge building upon knowledge learned at GCSE in much more detail. The skill focus of the controlled assessment is to use contextual knowledge and source analysis to appraise and evaluate the validity of multiple historical interpretations of Hitler’s rule. This is the culmination of all skills learned from KS3 to KS5 and is in essence the benchmark for students taking up the role of the historian as almost a foundation for undergraduate study of the subject.

Year 13 sequence of lessons

Subject

Half Term 1 

Half Term 2 

Half Term 3 

Half Term 4 

Half Term 5

Half Term 6

             

Why we sequence the scheme of work this way

In Year 13 our students move on from studying USA and South Africa to Unit 3 and 4 concurrently.

Unit 3 focuses on the History of the British Empire between 1756 and 1914 entitled “Losing and Gaining an empire”. This first half term we focus on what 18th century Brtain was like and societal and economic changes impacted British society and it’s empire focusing on the move towards free trade and the abolition of Slavery in 1833 as part of the Breadth study. Concurrently students will begin writing up their controlled assessment by selecting three interpretation of Nazi power to appraise and then defining their key arguments and how the Historians background impacts upon their interpretation of History.

In half term two our students continue with the Breadth study of the British Empire Topic. They build on prior knowledge of the mercantilist system to show how this led to the development of the Royal Navy and its role in British society. After completing the breadth study the students will then study a series of depth studies that are case studies of this change over time starting with the American War of Independence and looking at how changes in Britain resulted in defeat in America challenging common myths and misconceptions about the subject and comparisons to the Vietnam conflict studied in Year 9. Students then apply breadth study knowledge to a depth study of the early colonisation of Australia, students will also use source skills learned at KS3, KS4 and Year 12 to evaluate sources relating to the British Empire. Concurrently, students will also be writing controlled assessments using other knowledge and other sources to evaluate the validity of the texts they have chosen and already analysed in half term 1.

After Christmas students begin by looking at how British society and economic policy impacted British rule of Canada in the 1830s building on prior knowledge by comparing the British response to growing disaffection in Canada to the initial response to American hostility. They study this using source analysis and essay writing skills. At the same time in the controlled assessment students will have finished a first draft using criteria to specify which interpretation they find most compelling. After finishing Canada students will begin to look at reasons for British involvement in India and causes of gradual Indian resentment and then insurrection against British rule building on prior knowledge of how India can be a case study for gradual policy change over the 19th Century.

In half term 4 students then look at the causes of the Indian Mutiny in 1857 and the subsequent reasons for why Britain was able to put down the rebellion building on essay writing skills and source analysis essays to do this. Students then look at British intervention in Egypt in 1888 and then judge how this fits into their prior knowledge of how British acquisitions of territory and their reasons for and methods of doing so change over the course of the 19th century. Concurrently students will have been handed a first draft of their controlled assessment back and will be aiming to hand in their final piece at the end of this half term.

With the Empre Topic now finished and all content of the course completed as well as the controlled assessment now handed in students will use the 9 lessons a fortnight to revisit and revise the three main topics spending roughly 3 lessons a fortnight on each. Students will be set homework to revise knowledge and events at home so that in lessons they can apply this knowledge to exam questions on which answers are modelled by their class teacher using appropriate structures that enable students to meet the assessment objectives.