GLF Schools

GLF Schools

GLF Schools was founded in 2012 in order to enable the federation of Glyn School (an academy in 2011) and Danetree Junior School. Together, we began our journey to become a MAT of more than 1000 talented staff working with over 10,000 children in 40 schools across 5 regions in southern England.

We aim to develop our Chemists as young people that can become proactive, independent and resilient scientists. As a knowledge engaged curriculum, we believe that knowledge underpins and enables the application of skills; both are entwined. We are committed to providing a stimulating, engaging and intellectually challenging learning environment to enable all our students to develop scientific consciousness, to foster a spirit of scientific enquiry, enthuse students and create a sense of awe and wonder about the world which we inhabit. 

Head of Science and Chemistry Miss S Caverhill S.Caverhill@glynschool.org

 

Why study this subject?

Chemistry is a practical subject which allows you to observe chemical changes as well as learning some of the higher level skills that can be adapted to be used in a workplace in the 21st century. 

If you are interested in learning about the internal structures of the things around us, how the earth has changed since the big bang and carry out lots of experiments, this is the course for you.

Year 9 Science sequence of lessons

Year 9 Chemistry

Half Term 1 - Atomic Structure

The fundamental building block of Chemistry is the structure of the atom We start by ensuring students know the difference between elements and compounds and spend time building the practical skills required to separate mixtures in different ways. We then build on students’ knowledge of particles by exploring the development of the atomic model, the electronic configuration of the first twenty elements and encounter isotopes and ions. Once students are familiar with the atom, we start to explore the creation of the periodic table, how the elements fit into the periodic table, and we begin to explain how and why they ordered in the way that they are. We examine the scientific method in action and look at how ideas that scientists have develop over time.

Half Term 2 - Atomic Structure and Bonding and Structure

The fundamental building block of Chemistry is the structure of the atom We start by ensuring students know the difference between elements and compounds and spend time building the practical skills required to separate mixtures in different ways. We then build on students’ knowledge of particles by exploring the development of the atomic model, the electronic configuration of the first twenty elements and encounter isotopes and ions. Once students are familiar with the atom, we start to explore the creation of the periodic table, how the elements fit into the periodic table, and we begin to explain how and why they ordered in the way that they are. We examine the scientific method in action and look at how ideas that scientists have develop over time.

Half Term 3 - Bonding and Structure

Once students are comfortable with the structure of the atom and electron configuration, they are able to look at the interactions that occur between atoms. We start to investigate what holds different atoms together in compounds, molecules, and crystals. We investigate how these bonds affect the properties of materials and why certain types of structures have certain properties. Students begin to understand the materials around them and why they behave in the way that they do.

Half Term 4 - Bonding and Structure

Once students are comfortable with the structure of the atom and electron configuration, they are able to look at the interactions that occur between atoms. We start to investigate what holds different atoms together in compounds, molecules, and crystals. We investigate how these bonds affect the properties of materials and why certain types of structures have certain properties. Students begin to understand the materials around them and why they behave in the way that they do.

Half Term 5 – Energy Changes in Chemistry       

This half term we build on students understanding of bonding by focusing on the energy changes that happen during reactions. We will build new practical skills that will allow students to successfully conduct investigations, obtain and analyse their results and form conclusions. They will learn how to calculate the change in energy through reactions and how to show this in an energy profile diagram.

Half Term 6 – Basic Quantitative Chemistry and Careers in Chemistry

Now that our students have the fundamentals of atomic structure, bonding, the properties of structures and how to work out the energy changes those reactions have, we start to investigate the quantitative factors of Chemistry by linking the atomic structure to the mass of substances. We revisit the atomic mass and start to build in calculations that students will encounter in Year 10 and beyond. Through this, we start to show students some of the real-world applications of Chemistry by investigation careers that use the skills they are learning.

Year 10 Science sequence of lessons

Half Term 1 - Chemical Changes - Making Salts

Students have the foundations of atomic structure and are able to do basic calculations, this means we are ready to focus on specific reactions like those that involve the use of acids and metals. Students will be able to identify what is produced in different reactions, they will learn how to write equations for these reactions. Students will learn how to apply the calculations they have learnt previously to real life practical examples. Developing their practical skills and understanding the scientific method is key to this topic.

Half Term 2 - Chemical Changes - electrolysis

Students have covered ionic bonding and so are able to investigate how ionic compounds are split apart using electricity and why this is done. Again, students will use their prior knowledge of calculations to apply it to the practical examples used in this topic.

Half Term 3 - Energy Changes

This half term we build on students understanding of bonding by focusing on the energy changes that happen during reactions. We will build new practical skills that will allow students to successfully conduct investigations, obtain and analyse their results and form conclusions. They will learn how to calculate the change in energy through reactions and how to show this in an energy profile diagram.

Half Term 4 – Rate and Extent of Chemical Change

Students are now able to develop their understanding of reactions further, by looking at how the conditions of the reactions affect both the rate of reactions. We look further at what makes a reaction happen by investigating the collision theory in detail and what has an impact on successful collisions. Students will then look at how varying conditions can affect different types of reactions, for example reversible reactions. This will allow them to link their prior learning to the chemical industry and brings back some of the real-life applications of the calculations they had previously done, including bond energy and percentage yield.

Half Term 5 - Organic Chemistry

Now that students have a grasp of the intricacies of reactions, how to speed them up and increase the yield of useful products we look at a group of compounds that have specific reactions that are based in the world around them – the organic molecules. Students build on their bonding topic from year 9, looking exclusively at carbon-based molecules. They will discover their properties, reactions with each other and properties.

Half Term 6 - Organic Chemistry and Working Scientifically   

Having missed out on practical opportunities, students will now be able to link together all their knowledge to the scientific method. Learning how to write a hypothesis, plan an investigation, carry out a practical safely, collect their data, analyse, and draw conclusions from it. This will allow our students to move forward fully equipped with the skills that they need.

Year 11 Combined Science sequence of lessons

Half Term 1 – Chemical Analysis

Students use their knowledge of bonding and reactions to identify pure substances and mixtures. They gain practical skills in chromatography and gas tests to relate reactions to tests for substances.

Half Term 2 - Rate and Extent of Chemical Change and Chemistry of the Atmosphere

Students revisit their understanding of reactions further, by look at what makes a reaction happen by investigating the collision theory in detail and what has an impact on successful collisions. Students will then look at how varying conditions can affect different types of reactions, for example reversible reactions. This will allow them to link their prior learning to the chemical industry and brings back some of the real-life applications of the calculations they had previously done, including bond energy and percentage yield. Students then look at the chemistry of their atmosphere, they will link ideas of bonding and chemical analysis to identify the substances that make up our atmosphere, how humans have had an impact of the atmosphere and what could be done to ensure we put a halt to climate change with the help of Chemistry.

Half Term 3 – Using Resources

Students pull together all of their chemistry knowledge to investigate how it applies to things they use in everyday life. They need knowledge of all aspects to be able to make links to useful material such as drinking water, metals, alloys, glass, ceramics, and fertiliser. Again, we look at how Chemistry is able to reduce human’s impact on the environment by considering alternatives to conventional industrial methods. 

Half Term 4 – Rate and Extent of Chemical Change Revisited

Students revisit their understanding of reactions further, by look at what makes a reaction happen by investigating the collision theory in detail and what has an impact on successful collisions. Students will then look at how varying conditions can affect different types of reactions, for example reversible reactions. This will allow them to link their prior learning to the chemical industry and brings back some of the real-life applications of the calculations they had previously done, including bond energy and percentage yield. 

Half Term 5 – Revision

Students have now completed the course and will spend this term revising fully for their upcoming exams. They will be able to complete any required practical work that may not have been completed and recap all difficult concepts to fully prepare them for their examinations.

Half Term 6 – Revision

Students have now completed the course and will spend this term revising fully for their upcoming exams. They will be able to complete any required practical work that may not have been completed and recap all difficult concepts to fully prepare them for their examinations.

Year 11 Triple Science sequence of lessons

Half Term 1 - – Chemical Analysis

Students use their knowledge of bonding and reactions to identify pure substances and mixtures. They gain practical skills in chromatography and gas tests to relate reactions to tests for substances.

Half Term 2 - Chemistry of the Atmosphere

Students will then look at how varying conditions can affect different types of reactions, for example reversible reactions. This will allow them to link their prior learning to the chemical industry and brings back some of the real-life applications of the calculations they had previously done, including bond energy and percentage yield. Students then look at the chemistry of their atmosphere, they will link ideas of bonding and chemical analysis to identify the substances that make up our atmosphere, how humans have had an impact of the atmosphere and what could be done to ensure we put a halt to climate change with the help of Chemistry.

Half Term 3 – Using Resources

Students pull together all of their chemistry knowledge to investigate how it applies to things they use in everyday life. They need knowledge of all aspects to be able to make links to useful material such as drinking water, metals, alloys, glass, ceramics, and fertiliser. Again, we look at how Chemistry is able to reduce human’s impact on the environment by considering alternatives to conventional industrial methods.

Half Term 4 - Chemicals of the Atmosphere and Using Resources

Students identify chemicals of the atmosphere. They need to know about separating techniques to discuss how we know the composition of our atmosphere and about reactions to identify products that have an impact on our atmosphere.

Half Term 5 – Revision

Students have now completed the course and will spend this term revising fully for their upcoming exams. They will be able to complete any required practical work that may not have been completed and recap all difficult concepts to fully prepare them for their examinations.

 Half Term 6 – Revision

Students have now completed the course and will spend this term revising fully for their upcoming exams. They will be able to complete any required practical work that may not have been completed and recap all difficult concepts to fully prepare them for their examinations.

How is this course assessed at GCSE?

Two written exams.  Each paper is 1 hour 45 minutes and worth 50% of the final grade.  The papers will contain a mixture of multiple choice, data analysis, structured and open response questions. 

Students will complete eight required practical investigations throughout the course which can be assessed in the final written exams.

Further education opportunities after GCSE?

Chemistry can lead to A Levels in Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics, Applied Science, Geography, Psychology and Sociology.  It can also support BTEC qualifications in a variety of subjects and apprenticeships.

Year 12 Chemistry sequence of lessons

Subject

Half Term 1 

Half Term 2 

Half Term 3 

Half Term 4 

Half Term 5

Half Term 6

Chemistry

Topic 1 Atomic Structure and Topic 5 - Amount of Substance

Topic 2 - Bonding and Topic 3 - Redox I and Topic 6 - Organics I

Topic 4  - Inorganic Chemistry and Topic 6 - Organics I

Topic 8 - Energetics I and Topic 7 - Modern analytical Techniques

Topic 9 - Kinetics I and Topic 10 - Equilibria I 

Topic 13 - Energetics II 

Why we sequence the scheme of work this way

These are the fundamental building blocks of all of the Chemistry course. It builds on the understanding from GCSE chemistry and allows students to get to grips with more complex models of atomic structure and to recap their knowledge that underpins quantitative chemistry to allow students to use it in the rest of the course more fluently. Students facilitate their academic learning with practical skills that are key to Chemistry by collecting gases and carrying out basic titr

Students are now familiar with the more complex structure of the atom and we build on this by developing the ideas of how atoms interact with each other. We start to cover the more complex topic of bonding and the interactions of molecules which give rise to the trends in the periodic table. We then start to build on GCSE knowledge of organic chemistry where students are exposed to a variety of homologous series and begin to develop their dexterity in a wide array of practical skills. 

Students continue to develop their understanding of trends by looking at the reactions of Group 2 and 7 elements in more detail, focussing on their reactions and the reason they behave in the way they do. This is complemented by continuing to develop their skills in organic chemistry and practical work. 

Students will now have a good foundation of the fundamentals of chemistry. In this half term we will look at how organic substances can be identified analytically and how we analyse unknown compounds. Alongside this as students now understand the bonding and trends, we start to unpick how energy plays a part in reactions. Looking at enthalpy changes and calculating the energy released and absorbed when reactions take place. 

Students now start to look deeper into reactions, considering the energy of individual particles and how we can change how particles behave. To do this they must understand the kinetics of particles and how reversible reactions differ from irreversible reactions. They learn how to calculate the rate, yield and equilibrium constant of concentration for various reactions. 

As students have now covered all of the yer 12 syllabus and completed their PPE exams. We start to broaden their understanding of how energy changes govern the spontaneity of the reaction they have been looking at  and start to bring in the concept of chaos by calculating entropy and Free energy changes. 

Year 13 Chemistry sequence of lessons

Subject

Half Term 1 

Half Term 2 

Half Term 3 

Half Term 4 

Half Term 5

Half Term 6

 

Topic 13 - energetics II and Topic 11 - Equilibria II

Topic 12 - Acid Base, Topic 17 - Organic II  

Topic 18 - Organics III, Topic 16 - Kinetics II and Topic 14 - Redox II

Topic 19 - Modern Analytical Techniques II and Topic 15 - Transition Metals

Required Practical Recap and Revision

 

Why we sequence the scheme of work this way

Students ended their year 12 looking at energy changes and this is where we start it off again. Looking more deeply into the energy changes that happen in complex reactions, we start to look at the differences between theoretical data and experimental data. Students start building on ideas learnt in year 12 with equilibria as well, looking at equilibrium constants of pressure and variable concentrations. 

Now that students have grasped the basic equilibrium concepts we relate them to the acid and alkali reactions they have seen in lower years. This includes calculating pH and understanding how buffer solutions work. We start linking ideas in from other subjects and look at the real life application of the equilibria calculations that are being carried out. Alongside this students start to learn about more varied and complex organics molecules, reactions and mechanisms. They will start to use their prior knowledge to devise possible mechanism routes and start to relate this back to the kinetics covered in year 12.

Aromatic and nitrogen chemistry complete the organics learning for the year. These complex molecules start to combine all of the fundamentals of chemistry and allow students to link all of the organic chemistry completed into a synthesis pathway. This allows them to move from one homologous series to another using reactions, conditions and mechanisms covered in the course. Alongside this they start to build on their ideas of kinetics of particles and how to calculate the order of various reactions, again linking this back to the organic mechanisms covered in year 12. Students will then build on their ideas of oxidation and reduction by looking at half cells and move complex redox reactions and titrations. 

Finally students look at the complex transition metals, learning about how and why their oxidation numbers vary and how this affects their properties. They learn about complex ligands and relate this back to the bonding and shapes covered at the start of year 12.They will also learn about the final, more complex analytical techniques to identify unknown organic and inorganic compounds. Learning how to combine all analytical techniques to determine the mass, shape and bonding of similar compounds by analysing data. 

This half terms give students a chance to go over why they have carried out their core practicals in the way they have. Firming up their practical techniques and understanding of the practical work covered throughout the course. Students will then revise to allow them to perform at their best for the external exams. 

 

Career opportunities?

Medicine, Dentistry, Veterinary, Pharmacology and Engineering careers will all require Chemistry.