GLF Schools

GLF Schools

GLF Schools was founded in 2012 in order to enable the federation of Glyn School (an academy in 2011) and Danetree Junior School. Together, we began our journey to become a MAT of more than 1000 talented staff working with over 10,000 children in 40 schools across 5 regions in southern England.

Psychology students are encouraged to develop a fascination with the mind and the way that it influences our behaviour. Psychology students regularly relate material covered to their own lives and the world around them. Through research methods and exploring a range of approaches, they learn to question theories and research studies, as well as consider a range of perspectives.

Head of Psychology Mrs E Elwell E.Elwell@glynschool.org

Why study this subject?

Psychology is the scientific study of human behaviour, the Brain and the Mind. Psychologists observe human behaviour, create theories to explain the behaviour, and then carry out research to test these theories. Psychology is a challenging subject, requiring commitment and hard work. Ultimately though, the hard work is rewarded with a deeper understanding of people and society, and perhaps even yourself.

Is it right for me?

Psychology gives you a mental toolkit for analysing and interpreting information and builds empathy and understanding, supporting your ability to express yourself clearly and logically.

Psychology lessons vary, but tend to be made up of discussions, reading, investigating sources, debates and presentations. It is a broad subject, with many different areas and a number of different approaches towards explaining behaviour. Not all psychologists agree with each other.

 

Year 9 sequence of lessons

Year 9

Half Term 1 -  Developmental Psychology

Mindset, learning, practice and effort  

Dweck’s mindset theory and Willinghams learning theory.

Are skills with us from birth (nature) or do they change because of our experiences (nurture)?

This is an engaging first topic for Year 9 Psychologists as it is directly relevant to them as learners of new subjects and skills.

Half Term 2 -  How Memory Works

How does memory work? 

What is the key to enhancing your long term memory and how would a psychologist suggest you revise?  Why do we forget?  

This topic introduces the cognitive approach of psychology and the reductionism versus holism debate, showing students that psychologists take many different perspectives to understanding behaviour.

Half Term 3 - Neuropsychology and the Brain

How do our brains influence our behaviour?

What is the role of the brain and the central nervous system?  How does brain damage impact behaviour?

This topic has been chosen so that by the end of Year 9 students have a strong understanding of three different approaches to understanding behaviour: Developmental, Cognitive and Biological.

Half Term 4 - Social Psychology: Bystander behaviour

Why do people sometimes not help in emergency situations?

Students research the case study of Kitty Genovese, and analyse bystander behaviour. 

This topic has been chosen as it allows students to apply their psychological knowledge to the real world. Students 

Half Term 5 - Research Methods

Students develop a toolkit of research methods.

The topic has been chosen because a range of examples covered previously on the course can be used to help demonstrate different types of research methods. Students will be given insight into how Psychologist’s discover new things about behaviour which will be built upon every year of the course. 

Half Term 6 - Enrichment and Consolidation

This half term involves a range of consolidation activities based on the enriching topics previously covered. Students have the opportunity to apply their knowledge to new and unseen situations. This will help prepare students for the transition to Year 10 Psychology. 

Year 10 sequence of lessons

Half Term 1 - Memory and eyewitness testimony

Students learn about why our memories may not always be accurate and link this to eyewitness behaviour in the courtroom.

This follows on from student learning in Year 9 about how our memory works, but this time focussing on problems associated with memory.

Half Term 2 - Neuropsychology: gender differences

Is it true that men and women have different brains?

This follows on from student learning in Year 9 about areas of the brains, but this time focuses on how our brains might be different.

Half Term 3 - Social Psychology: obedience, conformity, and bystander behaviour

What causes someone to ‘act out of character’ - is it the social situation they are in?

For example, why did so many people obey the immoral instructions from Hitler in WWII? And why did some people resist?

Is it true that teenagers feel more ‘peer pressure’ than adults?

Year 10 students build upon their Year 9 knowledge of Social Psychology and continue to develop their application skills, making links between content and the world around us. 

Half Term 4 - Developmental Psychology: Stages of development and morality

When do we start to understand the difference between right and wrong?

Year 10 students build upon their Year 9 Developmental Psychology knowledge, exploring more complex ideas such as morality.

Half Term 5 - Research Methods: investigations and handling data

Psychologists collect data and make sure that their claims are backed up by scientific evidence. 

Year 10 students will develop a critical understanding about how Psychologists plan their research and why they might choose different research methods.

Half Term 6 - Enrichment and Consolidation

This half term involves a range of consolidation activities based on the enriching topics previously covered. Students have the opportunity to apply their knowledge to new and unseen situations. This will help prepare students for the transition to Year 11 Psychology.

Year 11 sequence of lessons

Half Term 1 - Psychological Problems: depression

What is depression and why might someone develop it?

How can we support someone with depression?

How can we treat depression?

Students use their understanding of genetics, brain areas and nurture to explore explanations and treatments for depression.

Half Term 2 - Criminal Psychology: what makes someone a criminal?

Are criminals born or made? 

Students use their understanding of genetics, brain areas and learning theories to explain why someone might become a criminal.

What influences our personality and is there such a thing as a ‘criminal personality type’?

Half Term 3 - Sleep and Dreaming

Why do we feel sleepy in the evening?

What happens to our brain  while we are asleep and why is it important we sleep at least 8 hours a night?

Students develop an understanding of Freud’s ‘dream work’ theory and discuss whether or not dreams have meaning. Could dream analysis be used as therapy or is this not scientific enough to be valid?

Half Term 4 - Research Methods 

Students explore different ways of handling data. They also prepare for the 12 mark research methods exam question using the knowledge they have gained from the previous topics. 

Half Term 5 - Revision and exam preparation

Year 12 sequence of lessons

Subject

Half Term 1 

Half Term 2 

Half Term 3 

Half Term 4 

Half Term 5

Half Term 6

 

Approaches, Social Psychology and Research Methods

Approaches, Social Psychology and Research Methods

Attachment, Memory and Research Methods

Attachment, Memory

Biopsychology and Psychopathology

Revision

Why we sequence the scheme of work this way

Students are introduced to the main perspectives in A level Psychology. This allows students to begin to see the diversity of explanations behind each human behaviour. These approaches underpin all further content so provide an excellent foundation for understanding and evaluating future topics.

 

Social Influence is taught in parallel as it is a relatable topic for students and allows them to underpin subject content with their own real world experiences. This starts to build their confidence on the course.

 

Research method topics such as the experimental method, reliability, validity and ethics. These topics are introduced alongside relevant examples within the content of approaches and social influence. For example students analyse the ethical implications of research on conformity and obedience.

Students are introduced to the main perspectives in A level Psychology. This allows students to begin to see the diversity of explanations behind each human behaviour. These approaches underpin all further content so provide an excellent foundation for understanding and evaluating future topics.

 

Social Influence is taught in parallel as it is a relatable topic for students and allows them to underpin subject content with their own real world experiences. This starts to build their confidence on the course.

 

Research method topics such as the experimental method, reliability, validity and ethics. These topics are introduced alongside relevant examples within the content of approaches and social influence. For example students analyse the ethical implications of research on conformity and obedience.

 

 

Attachment is taught after approaches as it is an excellent topic for applying different approaches previously covered. For example biological vs learning theories of attachment.

 

Memory is then covered as it is a helpful topic to assist students with their own progress with note taking, independent work and revision.

 

Research methods topics are tied into helpful examples for students. For example observations are taught when a key observation is covered, for example, the Ainsworth strange situation.

Attachment is taught after approaches as it is an excellent topic for applying different approaches previously covered. For example biological vs learning theories of attachment.

 

Memory is then covered as it is a helpful topic to assist students with their own progress with note taking, independent work and revision.

Biopsychology is taught at this part of the year as it builds on some of the biological elements covered in previous topics such as Approaches, Memory and Attachment.

 

Psychopathology is covered at this point of Year 12 as it is a fun and straightforward topic which can be covered at a faster pace if needed. This topic is also an excellent topic for applying the cognitive, behavioural and biological approaches covered at the start of the course in Approaches. The biological explanation of OCD works well with the parallel teaching of synaptic transmission in Biopsychology. 


 

Revision of key topics covered in Year 12 areas for consolidation. Students are encouraged to integrate their knowledge of the approaches and research methods throughout. Exam technique is emphasised.  

 

Year 13 sequence of lessons

Subject

Half Term 1 

Half Term 2 

Half Term 3 

Half Term 4 

Half Term 5

Half Term 6

 

History of Mental Illness 

&

Biological explanation of Child Development

Medical Model of Mental Illness

&

Alternatives to the Medical Model of Mental Illness

&

Cognitive explanation of Child Development

Biological explanation of Crime

&

Social explanation of Child Development

Cognitive explanation of Crime 

&

Social explanation of Crime

Revision

Revision

Why we sequence the scheme of work this way

Students apply their knowledge from Year 12 of the Biological Area, research methods and debates to understand how children develop in terms of intelligence and risk taking behaviours in teenagers. The History of mental Illness is a new topic in year 13 and introduces mental illness. Students learn underlying content that they will build on during half term 2 including: understanding abnormality and categorising OCD, depression and schizophrenia. They are introduced to questions such as ‘how valid and reliable are we at diagnosing mental illness’

In this part of mental illness students apply the areas and debates learned in Year 12 to understand the explanations and treatments of mental illness. They start by considering the biological area and the ‘medical model’ and then compare this to behaviourist, humanist and cognitive approaches in the ‘alternatives’ module. 

 

In Child Development, students apply principles from the cognitive area covered in Year 12 to understand how children learn and how we develop perception.

 

 

In the last topic of child development, students understand how social influences impact on child development, specifically focussing on attachment and the impact of children’s adverts on development. 

 

We move on from mental illness to crime at this point in the year. The structure of this module is very similar to that from child development. 

 

We start this topic by looking at whether or not we can explain criminal behaviour through biological differences, for example genetics and brain abnormalities. 

Students end the year furthering their understanding of crime. We apply the cognitive area learned in year 12 to understand how bias can impact decisions made in a courtroom, and to consider the best way to interview witnesses of crimes.

 

We consider social influence on crime. How does the appearance of an area impact on crime levels in that area? 

 

How does the situation of being in a prison change people’s behaviour; both as prisoners and guards?