GLF Schools

GLF Schools

GLF Schools was founded in 2012 in order to enable the federation of Glyn School (an academy in 2011) and Danetree Junior School. Together, we began our journey to become a MAT of more than 1000 talented staff working with over 10,000 children in 40 schools across 5 regions in southern England.

Design and Technology - Product Design - Key Stage 5

Design and Technology, at Glyn School, should equip students with the skills to design and make products that meet the particular needs of context and user group. It should encourage all students to be better problem solvers and understand that good design can help solve problems for future generations. Students will be equipped to consider the wider needs of society through responsible, ethical and sustainable design. It should foster a love of learning around how things are made and the changing factors that continue to influence the design process.

Year 12 sequence of lessons

Subject

Half Term 1 

Half Term 2 

Half Term 3 

Half Term 4 

Half Term 5

Half Term 6

Product Design

Design Skills: 3d, 2d drawing including 2 P Perspective, sectional drawing, isometric, orthographic and sectional drawings. What type of graphic communication suits the audience or need. Pen rendering and colour. 







 

Design Skill: CAD/CAM this is taught at in the second term because strong 3D skills are a requirement to be able to access the more advanced technologies like the 3D printer. 











 

Design Skills: CAD/CAM completion. Strategies to establish the client wants and needs. Research skills to develop design problems that require solutions now. Research techniques to produce information that is perceptive and relevant to enable quality design that meets the wants and needs of the client.


 

NEA and Design Skills: CAD/CAM completion. Design ideas and communication. Looking at the best ways to express ideas and ensure good communication. 












 

NEA and Design Skills: completing Design ideas and looking at how to critically evaluate design ideas against wants and needs to suggest starting points for the iterative development process. 










 
 

NEA and Design Skills: this term is used to complete any outstanding areas of the NEA and theory for the June examinations for year 12 students.










 

 

Why we sequence the scheme of work this way

We complete this at the start because quality visual communication both technical and sketching is essential to all the design aspects of this subject. 

 

Theory: materials knowledge - this is an in depth look at all the material areas the students need to know along with correct technical terminology. This is taught at the start because students will need a strong understanding of materials to be able to design later on. 

These skills are also vital for quality design and feed in to the technical drawing section of the NEA folder. They are also essential for any student considering studying any design discipline beyond A level - all students of design need strong CAD skills, irrespective of the requirements of the specification. CAM is also taught alongside this as they are natural bedfellows 

 

Theory: manufacturing processes - taught in the second half term because students will also need to understand how materials can be processed to be able to design and make products for the NEA folder.  

This is taught at this point in time to allow students to start the NEA with a strong emphasis on the first two sections. These sections are often not completed as well as others nationally so spending longer here and studying what and how to research are important in lifting skills. Starting the NEA at this point gives time to recap skills relevant to each section and provide sufficient time to produce good NEA work.





 

This is the next logical step in the NEA and also gives students evidence for portfolios for university interviews that are often held in the Autumn term. This particular skills set builds on the knowledge in term 1 and is the essential in later design so revisiting these skills and developing them at this point is sensible.

 

Theory:

This is the next stage in the NEA - while the NEA is iterative, the main design process is linear and, therefore, must be taught be completed sequentially.



 

Theory:











 

This forms a natural break in the design process allowing students to start development in year 13. It also provides an opportunity for students to revisit areas of the NEA to make improvements and complete any pieces that might be outstanding.


















 

Year 13 sequence of lessons

Subject

Half Term 1 

Half Term 2 

Half Term 3 

Half Term 4 

Half Term 5

Half Term 6

Product Design 

NEA and Design Skills:Development the iterative process, physical modelling, development strategies.   

NEA and Design Skills:Development and technical specification. CAD recap.


 

NEA and Design Skills:Build 





 

Build and Evaluate

Revision

 

Why we sequence the scheme of work this way

This is the next stage in the NEA - while the NEA is iterative, the main design process is linear and, therefore, must be taught be completed sequentially.



 

Theory:

This is the next stage in the NEA - while the NEA is iterative, the main design process is linear and, therefore, must be taught be completed sequentially.



 

Theory:

This is the next stage in the NEA - while the NEA is iterative, the main design process is linear and, therefore, must be taught be completed sequentially.



 

Theory:

This is the next stage in the NEA - while the NEA is iterative, the main design process is linear and, therefore, must be taught be completed sequentially.



 

Theory: