GLF Schools

GLF Schools

GLF Schools was founded in 2012 in order to enable the federation of Glyn School (an academy in 2011) and Danetree Junior School. Together, we began our journey to become a MAT of more than 1000 talented staff working with over 10,000 children in 40 schools across 5 regions in southern England.

Food Technology

Food Technology/Food Preparation and Nutrition combines creativity and skills to develop confident, healthy and independent individuals. Students learn the invaluable life skill of cooking and the pleasure of creating a wide variety of mouth-watering dishes. Our philosophy is to develop creative, confident and independent cooks. 

The focus is on learning a wide variety of cooking skills, whilst working safely and hygienically. The emphasis is placed on independence and resilience to follow a recipe and become self-sufficient. Students carry out a range of activities to develop their subject vocabulary, knowledge of, and understanding of, food related topics. A key focus is nutrition and the close relationship food has with health. We also explore the science behind cooking and why foods and ingredients behave the way they do.   

We believe the knowledge and skills gained from studying Food Technology will be invaluable in the future. 

Head of Food Technology Miss S West S.West@glynschool.org

Why study this subject?

The GCSE in Food Preparation and Nutrition has been designed to equip students with the knowledge, understanding and skills required to cook and apply the principles of food science, nutrition and healthy eating.

Is it right for me at GCSE?

By studying food preparation and nutrition, students will:

  • Learn to prepare and cook a wide range of products using a variety of ingredients, cooking techniques, processes and equipment, whilst developing an understanding of the sensory and nutritional properties of food, as well as health and safety.
  • Develop knowledge and understanding of the functional properties and chemical processes that occur when preparing and cooking food.
  • Understand the relationship between diet, nutrition and health, including the physiological and psychological effects of poor diet and health.
  • Develop knowledge and understanding of the economic, environmental, ethical, and socio-cultural influences on food availability, production processes, and diet and health choices.

How is this course assessed at GCSE?

Non-exam assessment (NEA) and one written exam.  Each make up 50% of the final grade.

 

The non-exam assessment will comprise of two tasks:

  • Task 1 (15%) will explore the principles underlying the preparation and cooking of food. As part of this, students will investigate and evaluate the working characteristics, functional and chemical properties of ingredients in a specific food, to achieve a particular result related to the preparation and cooking of food. They will develop a written report to present their findings.
  • Task 2 (35%) will test students’ knowledge, skills and understanding of the planning, preparation, cooking and presentation of food. As part of this students will plan a menu of three dishes, which will then be prepared, made and presented in a three-hour practical exam. This will be accompanied by a written portfolio.

Further education opportunities after GCSE?

Degrees are available in a wide range of food-related fields including: Food Technology, Nutrition and Dietetics, Marketing and Food Retail. The course is also useful for students considering NVQ qualifications in Catering.

 

Career opportunities?

Food Preparation and Nutrition can provide a good background for work in Catering, Day and Residential Care, Health Services, Dietitian, Nutritionist and Teacher. However, note that to become a Dietician or Food Scientist, it’s important to do well in Science.

Year 7 sequence of lessons

Subject

Half Term 1 

Half Term 2 

Half Term 3 

Half Term 4 

Half Term 5

Half Term 6

Food Tech Year 7 

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

Why we sequence the curriculum in this way 

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

Year 8 sequence of lessons

Subject

Half Term 1 

Half Term 2 

Half Term 3 

Half Term 4 

Half Term 5

Half Term 6

 Year 8 Food Technology 

The Eatwell Guide

Why we sequence the curriculum in this way 

As an introduction to Food Technology, students spend one full term focusing on the five different sections that make up The Eatwell Guide. Students in turn complete practical activities and theory lessons, understanding fruit and vegetables, protein, carbohydrates, dairy and oils and spreads. 

Year 9 sequence of lessons

Subject

Half Term 1 

Half Term 2 

Half Term 3 

Half Term 4 

Half Term 5

Half Term 6

Food Tech 

Year 9 

Food Safety and Basic Skills

Healthy Eating and Basic Skills

Healthy Eating and Food Science

Food Science, Farming and Time Plans

International Cuisines

Factors Influencing Food Choice

Why we sequence the scheme of work this way

Students are taught to be fully aware of procedures that should be followed in a kitchen, and why, covering content on the GCSE specification. Students are assessed each lesson by being given a hygiene rating. Practical lessons review and build on the basic skills learnt in Year 8.

Students are introduced to micro and macro nutrients and learn about food sources and functions. They also complete practicals that link to theory learnt, allowing students to develop their cooking skills. 

After competing nutrition theory, students move on to look at raising agent theory to introduce students to food science and experimental work. This is to start preparing them for their NEA Task 1 that they will complete in Year 11.

After finishing their focus on food science, students move on to look at farming. In this half term, they also develop more complex skills, such as jointing a chicken and pasta making, and learn how to write a time plan, which is a key skill that they will use throughout the three years in preparation for NEA Task 2.

To expose students to different foods from around the world, they look at international cuisines. During this half term, students also complete practical assessments, which act as a mini-mock of NEA Task 2. The purpose of this is to encourage students to work independently in sourcing and making dishes, with a focus on showcasing their skills. A more detailed mock is completed in Year 10. 

To lead on from international cuisine, students review a range of factors influencing food choice.

 

Year 10 sequence of lessons

Subject

Half Term 1 

Half Term 2 

Half Term 3 

Half Term 4 

Half Term 5

Half Term 6

Food Tech 

Year 10 

Microorganisms

Key terms

Dietary Needs

Food Processing

Mock NEA 2

Mock NEA 2

Why we sequence the scheme of work this way

Students are introduced to microorganisms and bacterial contamination and how this impacts food. Students also investigate how microorganisms are used in food production. Practical lessons allow this theory allowing students to demonstrate the use of microorganisms in their dishes.

Students focus on developing their literacy and language skills this term as well as the working characteristics, functional and chemical properties of nutrients. This tem also sees students conduct a mock NEA1; an investigation into different chemical reactions in food. 

This term sees students having more choice in their practical dishes where they are asked to select dishes that are suitable for a particular dietary need, health condition or age group.

The focus of this term is for students to understand how food is processed according to requirements, students understand the differences in primary and secondary processing across a variety of different food industries. 

Students are presented with a mock NEA 2 brief which requires students to research into a food related brief, conduct trialing of dishes, completing a time plan before undertaking a 3 hour practical exam in preparation for Year 11. Students will complete a mock written paper as well culminating all their learning so far. 

Year 11 sequence of lessons

Subject

Half Term 1 

Half Term 2 

Half Term 3 

Half Term 4 

Half Term 5

Half Term 6

Food Tech 

Year 11 

NEA Task 1

NEA Task 2

NEA Task 2

NEA Task 2 / Revision

Revision and Exam Technique

N/A

Why we sequence the scheme of work this way

The GCSE specification stipulates that NEA must be completed in Year 11. Briefs for NEA Task 1 are released on the 1st September.

Briefs for NEA Task 2 are released on the 1st November.

Upon completion of NEA Task 2, attention will move to the final written exam, which accounts for 50% of the final GCSE grade. Lessons will focus on revising topics and exam technique.