GLF Schools

GLF Schools

GLF Schools was founded in 2012 in order to enable the federation of Glyn School (an academy in 2011) and Danetree Junior School. Together, we began our journey to become a MAT of more than 1000 talented staff working with over 10,000 children in 40 schools across 5 regions in southern England.

The Music department provides a varied education for musicians in order to enable students to reach their full potential as musicians. This includes:Students in Years 7 and 8 are given the opportunity to experience playing as many instruments as possible in order to gain the basic skills for performing music. Projects are designed in Year 8 to enable staff to identify students who have the necessary skills to study music further for GCSE. Staff members of the department have their own areas of expertise which together cover the full range of teaching needed for the full GCSE course. Students are inspired by staff who regularly perform in lessons and as part of school concerts. This includes the annual whole school musical productions where students sing, perform in the pit orchestra and get experience of music technology. Staff invest their own time to rehearse with students and support them out of lesson times when students can use the facilities to rehearse and use the specialist software. We retain our highly skilled peripatetic instrumental teachers that teach students on a 1 to 1 basis in order to support the development of students performance skills in preparation for GCSE performance coursework. Many students make fantastic achievements in their instrumental grades and these are celebrated by the department and shared with the wider community. The department provides a variety of extracurricular clubs for all students so that they are provided with performance opportunities throughout the year.

Head of Music Mrs S Davis S.Davis@glynschool.org

Why study this subject?

If you enjoy performing music in your own time, can play an instrument (including singing), and enjoy composing your own music using iMacs then this is a good subject to choose. This course will broaden your knowledge of many types of music, and give you an appreciation of the diversity of musical styles that exist today.

 

Is it right for me?

The course is suitable for students who have taken Music in Year 9. Students must be having private instrumental lessons to enter this course.

Year 7 sequence of lessons

Half Term 1

Half Term 2

Half Term 3

Half Term 4

Half Term 5

Half Term 6

1. Ukulele Rock School Debut

2. Rhythm / African drumming

3. Piano Rock School Debut

4.Piano (extended)

5. Famous artists and music

6. World Music

Students are introduced to notes, chords, tempo and tonality. Students learn, with the use of Ukuleles, to develop their understanding of musical notation and how this is used to learn pieces of music effectively. 4 chords are learnt for the debut level entry pieces to begin with and students then work towards full song performances on Ukulele at the end of the half term. Students are assessed on their group performances of Rock School pieces suitable for their skill level.

Students are also assessed on their knowledge of musical notation and instrumental understanding.

The use of Djembe drums in this project allows students to begin to develop their musical listening skills and use the subject specific language for describing the elements of music (rhythm, dynamics, tempo, notation, pulse). Students also continue developing their understanding of musical notation and performance directions and applying it to different instrumental contexts. Students are assessed on group performances of a set piece.

Students are also assessed on their knowledge of musical notation and instrumental understanding.

This project allows students to develop basic piano skills and understand detailed traditional music notation. Students complete Rock School pieces where they learn how to perform a melody and accompaniment together. This is the first time students attempt to play different parts together. More advanced piano players have access to more complex pieces that will allow them to further develop these essential skills. Students are assessed in Rock School performances of their chosen pieces.

Students are also assessed on their knowledge of musical notation and instrumental understanding.

This project has been chosen to allow students more time to master their piano skills and expand their notation knowledge started in half term 3. Students will focus on the bass clef to begin with, using a note naming game to help them increase their reading speed. Students will use the Rock School debut piece 'Imagine' by John Lennon to enhance their notation reading ability alongside developing their piano playing skills. More advanced piano players are introduced to more complex pieces to ensure their progress continues throughout the project. Students are assessed on their performance of 'imagine' or more complex pieces if achieved.

Students are also assessed on their knowledge of musical notation and instrumental understanding.

Students continue to expand their understanding of the social context in music and expand their music history knowledge. In each lesson, students are introduced to famous musicians and their music throughout the years as well as learning some of the pieces of music on instruments as well. This ensures students experience an eclectic mix of music and some may even discover a new favourite musician! Students are assessed in a listening task that allows students to demonstrate their understanding of music through audio as well as their increased knowledge of music history across a variety of genres. 

Students are also assessed on their knowledge of musical notation and instrumental understanding.

We complete Year 7 with world music. This includes music from Africa and Latin America. Students use Percussion and Samba instruments to learn the complex rhythms inherent in these styles. Students experience a wide variety of percussion instruments and discover where their strengths are. Class performances develop each lesson and form one part of the assessment for this project. Students are also assessed on their individual achievements with the complex syncopated rhythms they learn.

Students are also assessed on their knowledge of musical notation and instrumental understanding.

Year 8 sequence of lessons

Half Term 1

Half Term 2

Half Term 3

Half Term 4

Half Term 5

Half Term 6

1. Piano Grade 1

2. Ukulele Grade 1

3 and 4. Keane band project

5. Loops and Planets

6. Festivals

Year 8 develops students' ability on a wide variety of instruments including piano, bass guitar, electric guitar, acoustic guitar, ukulele and drum kit. During this first half term students focus on developing their piano skills as they form the basis for a lot of musical knowledge and understanding. Students follow the grade 1 RockSchool syllabus and perform at the end of the half term.

Students continue to develop their Ukulele skills to include melodic as well as chordal skills. Rock School Grade 1 resources are used to support students' learning as well as helping them to perform in time with other parts on backing tracks. These are important skills for the students to develop in preparation for performing in bands later on in the year.

This project expands over the whole spring term in order to allow students sufficient time to rehearse as a band. Students learn the separate parts to a song by Keane and then develop their understanding of how to put them together to create the whole sound. Lessons in the first half term concentrate on developing the individual parts needed for the song. Lessons in the second half term concentrate on developing students ensemble skills, extending this to one student per part where possible. More advanced musicians are encouraged to tackle new instruments in this project to help them expand their repertoire of skills.

Students are given the opportunity to experience creating music using soundtrap. Students bring together all of their musical knowledge from key stage 3 to compose pieces of music for the planets using apple loops. Each lesson, students consider the required emotional setting for each planet and how they will create this in their work. This allows students the opportunity to experience another element of the GCSE (composition) so that they can make an informed decision about their option choices.

Students learn about the history and development of music festivals including iconic performances as well as some new genres to discover. Students learn what planning a music festival entails and how to begin understanding the different roles and responsibilities that are involved. This project culminates with students creating their own festival plan and presenting it in a Dragons Den style presentation bid.

Year 9 sequence of lessons

Subject

Half Term 1

Half Term 2

Half Term 3

Half Term 4

Half Term 5

Half Term 6

Year 9 (Eduqas)

The elements of music

Christmas performance

Group performance and the blues

Solo performance and carnival of the animals

Arranging music

Composition

Why we sequence the scheme of work this way

Students are introduced to the overview of the GCSE components to ensure they understand why such a variety of skills are required on this course. Teachers ensure that all students are taking peripatetic lessons and participating in regular music clubs as part of their homework. Students are then introduced to the musical elements and begin using them in a simplified way to analyse music by ear using musical vocabulary to describe it. This is one of the most difficult components of the course and early exposure to these skills is vital for students to enjoy developing their understanding of music. During this half term, students also experience a wide variety of genres, composers, and performers including the wonderfully weird world of minimalism!

Students rehearse on their chosen instruments towards a public performance of a Christmas piece. This is the first public performance that some students will take part in and is a great experience for everyone involved. Students perform towards the end of the term in the local church where members of the local community gather to listen and watch our talented students perform and kick start Christmas. Students rehearse and perform a whole class piece as well as solo performances where possible. This is an exciting event where people outside of the music class can hear our students perform.

Lessons continue to relate to the musical elements work that commenced from the Autumn term in order to allow students to continue to access this information in their working memory. Students use this knowledge and understanding to learn how to play in the blues genre and experience another new genre of music including aspects such as walking bass patterns from existing songs and improvisation, many for the first time. Students work towards preparing group performances of the blues so that teachers can monitor if students are working at the right instrumental level for this stage in the course. Performances take place in the last week of this half term during class time. This is done in front of other students so that students begin getting used to performing to an audience. Teachers explain how students will be assessed during these performances to enable students to begin to understand and apply the Eduqas mark scheme.

In this half term music students are introduced to The Carnival of the Animals. This allows students to start exploring the effect of musical elements to create a set atmosphere. Students also work towards preparing solo performances this half term so that teachers can monitor if students are working at the right instrumental level for this stage in the course. Performances take place in the last week of this half term during class time. This is done in front of other students so that students continue getting used to performing in front of an audience. The preparation for this is set as homework so that students can work towards this performance with their own private instrumental teacher.

Now that students have gained an understanding and some experience of how to analyse the use of musical elements, this half term gives the students their first experience of using these same musical elements to create their own arrangements of music. Students explore existing arrangements of music they know through the use of programs such as Radio 1s live lounge. This helps to expand students' cultural capital as many genres are included in this topic.

Students practically create compositions on their chosen instruments this half term using analysis of existing music in each lesson to inspire them and help them create new ideas to experiment within their own compositions. This allows students the opportunity to experience the composing component of the GCSE. Each lesson has a main focus element in order to support students developing understanding as well as guiding students through how to create pieces of music from scratch. Composition is the last component taught in the year 9 curriculum as students must gain an insight into how musical elements are put together before they can start attempting composing music themselves. By the end of year 9, all students will have experienced all components of the GCSE as well as using all of their developing musical knowledge in all tasks.

Year 10 sequence of lessons

Year 10 (Eduqas)

Short composition tasks

Free composition coursework

Musical eras

Film music

Set GCSE work anaylsis

Analysing and experiencing musical genres

Why we sequence the scheme of work this way

Students begin their composition coursework during this term in order for them to be able to manage their workload and be able to dedicate the desired amount of time to complete their music coursework in balance with their other studies. Students explore their compositional skills in a variety of short composing tasks in various genres in order to self-assess what genres suit their strengths. As students work through these short tasks students are guided towards understanding how they can achieve the highest coursework grade possible. This allows students and teachers to choose the most suitable genre for students to complete their full GCSE free composition in.

Students are reminded of how they are assessed in their composition coursework at the start of this half term. Students assess their peers' work every lesson which develops their own understanding and use of musical language in relation to music. This not only enables students to progress in their coursework but also develops students' use of musical analysis with correct terminology.

Students now begin applying their knowledge and understanding of the musical elements to the eras of music within classical music. This area of study is one that they must understand in detail for their GCSE but they will use their year 9 skills to help them access this music. Students learn the key features, composers, and compositions from each era and learn how to recognise them aurally. This enables students to see how all lessons are building towards the bigger picture of understanding and appreciating the music of all genres.

Students focus on film music this half term looking in detail at how the musical elements are used for effect on the screen. A wide variety of films are analysed and students enjoy seeing how a change of music can change the effect of a film so much. Students explore the work of famous film composers such as Hans Zimmer and John Williams.

At this point, the students return to their appraising component and expand their listening to develop an eclectic selection of music genres. Students begin listening to jazz, Latin, blues, rap, big band, etc in order to expand their experience of musical genres. Particular focus will be given to the student's set work for their GCSE in AOS 4. This will allow students to revisit previous knowledge and expand on how they can apply it to new genres. This will support students sitting their PPEs during this term in order to experience a full GCSE exam paper.

This half term sees students continuing to develop their appraising component skills and expand their listening to develop an eclectic selection of music genres. Students begin listening to samba, African, Celtic, 21st century, minimalism, tone rows, etc in order to expand their experience of musical genres. This will allow students to revisit previous knowledge and continue to expand on how they can apply it to new genres. This will support students sitting their PPEs during this term in order to experience a full GCSE exam paper.

Year 11 sequence of lessons

Year 11

Set brief composition

Composition and solo performing

Performance coursework recording

Performance coursework recording

Examination preparation

Why we sequence the scheme of work this way

Students begin working towards their set work compositions. Completion of short compositional tasks allows students to trial techniques for applying a setting to a piece of music for the desired effect. This is the main difference with this year's composition compared to their year 10 work. Students analyse music and use their musical understanding to dissect existing pieces of music to allow them to see how established composers created these desired effects. Students then apply this knowledge to their own creations.

Students continue creating their set brief compositions with the aim of completion by the end of the term. Students also ensure that they are preparing for their solo recordings that will take place in January.

Students will record their solo performances in the recording studio at the start of this half term. Time is dedicated to ensuring students are performing suitable pieces, at a high enough standard under pressure during this term. Mock performances to the teacher take place regularly to enable this and ensure all students are prepared for their recording session. This is completed at this stage in the year to allow students the maximum amount of time to develop their instrumental skills as possible and therefore gain the highest marks possible.

Students will record their group performances in the recording studio at the end of this half term. Time is dedicated to ensuring students are performing suitable pieces, at a high enough standard under pressure during this term. Mock performances to the teacher take place regularly to enable this and ensure all students are prepared for their recording session. This is completed at this stage in the year to allow students the maximum amount of time to develop their instrumental skills as possible and therefore gain the highest marks possible.

Students now solely concentrate on the exam component of the GCSE. Students look at past papers, examiner reports, and Eduqas resources to support their learning. Students have this intense half term of exam preparation in order to focus their memory on the exam content. Students sit mock exam papers in class in a variety of ways so that all students can access the work and develop their working memory in the build-up to the exam paper.

Year 12 sequence of lessons

Subject

Half Term 1 

Half Term 2 

Half Term 3 

Half Term 4 

Half Term 5

Half Term 6

MUSIC

Component 1 – Introduction to recording and mixing.

Component 2 – Introduction to technology-based composition

Component 3 – Introduction to the Component 3 exam

Component 4 – Handling and mixing audio

Component 1 – Recording acoustic/bass guitar and intermediate mixing skills

Component 2 – Introduction to technology based composition

Component 3 – Analogue technology and vocal production

Component 4 – Theoretical and practical tasks focusing on MIDI, dynamics and distortion

Component 1 – Exploring the mark scheme, recording percussion/keyboards and advanced mixing

Component 2 – Exploring mark scheme criteria

Component 3 – Detailed exploration of the question paper and focus on analogue synthesisers/electric instruments

Component 4 – Detailed exploration of the question paper and specimen long-response questions

Component 1 – Practice brief sessions, mixing practice and mastering

Component 2 – Practice brief sessions

Component 3 – Comparing analogue and digital effects

Component 4 – Specimen questions

Component 1 - refine and finish practice brief for internal marking/feedback

Component 2 – refine and finish practice brief for internal marking/feedback.

Component 3 –

final revision activities ahead of the mock exam.

Component 4 –  final revision activities ahead of mock exam.

Component 1 – Drum-recording project and prescribed brief preparation

Component 2 – Prescribed brief preparation

Why we sequence the scheme of work this way

This allows us to gauge if the students are able to meet the basic requirements of the course as well as allowing students to see if the course is suitable for themselves.

This allows students to grasp the methodology and process of completing both C1 and C2. At the same time as introducing the basic concepts of the knowledge required for all areas of study 

This gives students a more in depth look at the C1 and C2 mark scheme, allowing them to tweak their projects to fit the mark schemes.

We explore the question papers and start to learn how to structure answers with the knowledge they have gained. 

Gives students the opportunity to complete a full ‘practise’ brief for C1 and C2. This is marked against the mark scheme. The papers for C3 and C4 are the first experience the students get of taking a paper. Allowing them to develop their understanding of how best to answer Music Technology questions.

This is an opportunity for students to independently review and improve on the projects they are working on. Leading to marking and feedback from teachers.

This half term gives students time to prepare and bridge any gaps in their knowledge to be ready for year 13. Preparation to start C1 is made so we can hit the ground running in September.

Year 13 sequence of lessons

Subject

Half Term 1 

Half Term 2 

Half Term 3 

Half Term 4 

Half Term 5

Half Term 6

Music

Component 1 – Introduction to recording and mixing.

Component 2 – Introduction to technology-based composition

Component 3 – Introduction to the Component 3 exam

Component 4 – Handling and mixing audio

Component 1 – Recording acoustic/bass guitar and intermediate mixing skills

Component 2 – Introduction to technology based composition

Component 3 – Analogue technology and vocal production

Component 4 – Theoretical and practical tasks focusing on MIDI, dynamics and distortion

Component 1 – Exploring the mark scheme, recording percussion/keyboards and advanced mixing

Component 2 – Exploring mark scheme criteria

Component 3 – Detailed exploration of the question paper and focus on analogue synthesisers/electric instruments

Component 4 – Detailed exploration of the question paper and specimen long-response questions

Component 1 – Practice brief sessions, mixing practice and mastering

Component 2 – Practice brief sessions

Component 3 – Comparing analogue and digital effects

Component 4 – Specimen questions

Component 1 - refine and finish practice brief for internal marking/feedback

Component 2 – refine and finish practice brief for internal marking/feedback.

Component 3 –

final revision activities ahead of the mock exam.

Component 4 –  final revision activities ahead of mock exam.

Component 1 – Drum-recording project and prescribed brief preparation

Component 2 – Prescribed brief preparation

Why we sequence the scheme of work this way

This allows us to gauge if the students are able to meet the basic requirements of the course as well as allowing students to see if the course is suitable for themselves.

This allows students to grasp the methodology and process of completing both C1 and C2. At the same time as introducing the basic concepts of the knowledge required for all areas of study 

This gives students a more in depth look at the C1 and C2 mark scheme, allowing them to tweak their projects to fit the mark schemes.

We explore the question papers and start to learn how to structure answers with the knowledge they have gained. 

Gives students the opportunity to complete a full ‘practise’ brief for C1 and C2. This is marked against the mark scheme. The papers for C3 and C4 are the first experience the students get of taking a paper. Allowing them to develop their understanding of how best to answer Music Technology questions.

This is an opportunity for students to independently review and improve on the projects they are working on. Leading to marking and feedback from teachers.

This half term gives students time to prepare and bridge any gaps in their knowledge to be ready for year 13. Preparation to start C1 is made so we can hit the ground running in September.